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Fly Fishing Things

WADING BOOTS               Back to Categories

Choose between affordability or durability--or get both.

flyfishingthings.com/wading boot

Wading boots are boots made to wear in water like boots you wear on land. 

They’re designed to keep the fly fisherman from slipping and losing traction while wading, and to prevent rocks from injuring your feet.

It’s important that the wading boot has a felt sole, because rocks can be very slippery, and you don’t want to go for a swim while wading in really cold water. Felt soles keep you from slipping while wading in a stream that has very slimy rocks.

 
A wading boot should have a steel toe or a reinforced toe section, and provide strong support to the ankle. Streams with boulders the size of basket balls can be very demanding to wade. The rocks in the water are slimy by nature. If you step and slip on one you can jam and injure your foot easily. You can also, fall over and be under water before you know it. A well made wading boot will soften the blow when the foot slides hard against a rock.

 The thickness of the wading boot sole should be thick enough to prevent you from feeling sharp pointy little rocks when you step on them.  When you start to feel the rocks through the bottom of the wading boot it's time to replace the felt sole. flyfishingthings.com/wading boot

Wading boots should be easy to put on and take off, and wading boots preferably should last more than one full season of fly-fishing.

 A conundrum develops when you choose between a wading boot  made of  leather and one made of synthetic materiel.  On the up side, a wading boot made of leather is very durable, provide great protection against rocks, and last a long time.  The down side is leather shrinks when it dry's.  This is not a problem with wading boots made from synthetic materials; shrinking, that is. If you buy a leather wading boot, be prepared to soak it before you attempt to put it on, other wise, until the leather stretches out, its going to be about a half size too small.  Also, leather wading boots are much heavier than wading boots made from synthetic materials.

 Wading boots today have laces, Velcro straps and zippers to close them up with. 
I personally prefer a wading boot that laces as apposed to one that Velcro straps or zips up.  I don't like zippers because the teeth can break, or can get stuck at the most in opportune time(like when you're getting ready to go fishing).

The height of a wading boot is something to consider.  I like my wading boot to reach above the ankle.  A tall boot like either of the two shown above, can be laced relatively tight at the top to ensure that the gravel guards will fit  far enough down over the boot to keep gravel from entering the boot while stream fishing. A taller boot also provides better ankle support than a short boot.

 flyfishingthings.com/wading shoeWading boot weight
I prefer a lightweight boot, however considering the conundrum mentioned above, a compromise may be in order. I think in the long run, I go with durability and strength.

 In the course of a day of wade fishing anything you can do to lighten the load is helpful. Standing in a strong current takes a toll on you after a while. On the other hand, a light weight wading boot will cause a change in how you feel after walking a mile or two of stream shoreline looking for trout, or a place to fish, or to get away from the crowded section of a stream. Something to think about.

 Low cut wading shoes are stylish and lightweight and have become somewhat popular. However, I’m not a fan of low cut wading shoes simple because they're low cut. I have a reason why I don't prefer them.  When you wade with a low cut wading shoe(e
ven if the waders have good gravel guards), gravel will still get into the shoe. When that happens, you have to leave the river, sit down and take them off,  rinse the gravel out, put them back on, then go back to fishing.  Do you really want to do all that?  Enough said.

 Like everything else in the world of fly-fishing you get what you pay for. In the case of wading boots, you really need to think about the type of fishing you're going to be doing and make your choice based on that.  I trust I have given you some food for thought.